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F1’s attempt to host grand prix in Miami hits hump in the road

Plan announced this week to host race in Florida city faces opposition from some local people due to its impact and noise

“A vacuum humping a goat”. Well, try and banish the picture, if that is possible, but consider instead the sound. An unholy conjugation of machine and animal from which Formula One would surely like to keep its distance.

This description of the sound of F1 cars is not the aural sculpture the sport wants associated with its expansion in North America. Yet said development, in the form of this week’s announcement of an agreement in principle to host a race in Miami, may yet see the delightfully colourful phrase bandied around for a while longer.

Related: Mercedes flex muscles in Japan to leave rivals in the rear-view mirror

Related: F1: Miami Grand Prix postponed until 2020 to avoid ‘sub-optimal’ street course

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Mercedes flex muscles in Japan to leave rivals in the rear-view mirror

Ferrari were left to rue shambolic management of their drivers after Mercedes’ near-perfect grand prix showing at Suzuka

Sealing their sixth consecutive constructors’ championship and ensuring they will secure a record sixth constructors’ and drivers’ double had an almost inevitable air after Mercedes’ strong start to the season. Having clinched it in Japan, their inexorable march should not detract from a remarkable achievement. It stretches back to the groundwork laid by Ross Brawn and the structures he created back in 2010. Three years of hard work and development ensued and what has emerged since has been outstanding. The team has come through on top after two major regulation changes, a feat never achieved before. After 2014 they were untouchable and in 2017, while the fight intensified, they remained on top. Nor should it be assumed that their success is simply a virtue of spending. In recent times both Toyota and Honda have proved that money alone guarantees nothing. A tighter battle at the front would be more than welcome and long overdue but it means others stepping up to match a Mercedes team showing no sign of weakness.

Yeah, going through 130R is cool. But how about one-handed....?

Nicely done @Charles_Leclerc #JapaneseGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/JaCyKG3PNb

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Valtteri Bottas storms to win in Japan as Mercedes take constructors’ title

• Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel holds off Lewis Hamilton for second
• Bottas now only man who can catch Hamilton for drivers’ title

Valtteri Bottas won the Japanese Grand Prix, taking a controlled victory from Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel in second. With the Finn’s Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton in third it ensures the team secured the constructors’ championship. Red Bull’s Alexander Albon was in fourth, with Carlos Sainz in fifth for McLaren and Charles Leclerc in sixth.

Bottas’s win has just kept his championship hopes alive, although Hamilton is still on course to take his sixth title. The British driver leads the Finn by 64 points and will take the championship if he is 78 in front after the Mexican Grand Prix.

Related: Japanese Grand Prix: Formula One 2019 – Bottas wins, Mercedes secure constructors' championship - live!

Related: Charles Leclerc brings winds of change to Ferrari in move on No 1 spot

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Japanese Grand Prix: Formula One 2019 – live!

  • Updates from the race at the Suzuka circuit
  • Ferrari lock-out front row of the grid in Sunday qualifying
  • Any thoughts? Email or tweet @scott_heinrich

Good afternoon, sports fans. Welcome to a Sunday at Suzuka that, thanks to Typhoon Hagibis, can only be described as super. This is just the fifth time in Formula One history that qualifying and the race has been held on the same day. And the morning’s action didn’t disappoint, whetting the appetite for what should be a fascinating race.

Qualifying belonged solely to Ferrari, the Scuderia locking out the front row with Sebastian Vettel to start from pole ahead of Charles Leclerc. It’s Ferrari’s fifth successive pole position, a feat they haven’t achieved since 2001 and something that will be even more satisfying after the dominance of Mercedes in practice. The Mercedes duo of Valtteri Bottas and Lewis Hamilton will start on the second row.

#Quali results #Seb5 1️⃣#Charles16 2️⃣#essereFerrari #JapaneseGP pic.twitter.com/VCetFxfsVe

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Charles Leclerc brings winds of change to Ferrari in move on No 1 spot

Sebastian Vettel started the year as Ferrari’s lead driver but his 21-year-old teammate has disrupted the status quo

Formula One may have had to hunker down this weekend when Typhoon Hagibis forced qualifying for the Japanese Grand Prix to be postponed but Ferrari were already busy weathering a storm of their own. Hagibis will pass but the turbulent air at the Scuderia may continue to roll.

Team orders left Ferrari looking poorly organised and impotent at the previous race in Russia. They want more victories now they have the car to achieve them. But, as Lewis Hamilton suggested, perhaps what they need – with the mechanical finally firing – is a rethink.

Related: Japan orders evacuations as Typhoon Hagibis arrives

Related: Beware the enemy within: Leclerc and Vettel continue a timeless F1 tradition | Richard Williams

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F1 takes no risks in Japan with memories of Bianchi’s death still fresh | Giles Richards

The fatal crash suffered by Jules Bianchi in 2014 made the postponement of qualifying both necessary and inevitable

Formula One’s decision to postpone qualifying for the Japanese Grand Prix until Sunday morning was entirely expected and indeed, understandable. Taking risks with driver safety given the expected arrival of Typhoon Hagibis seemed unthinkable.

Suzuka was where the accident that ultimately led to the death of Jules Bianchi occurred five years ago. The sense of loss and sadness has not diminished in time. Since he died F1 has made greater strides towards safety but recent events have served as salutary reminders that the sport remains dangerous enough without taking chances with the weather.

Related: Formula One cancels all Saturday running as Typhoon Hagibis looms at Japan GP

Related: Hagibis may wreak havoc in Suzuka but nothing can stop Mercedes | Giles Richards

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Formula One cancels all Saturday running as Typhoon Hagibis looms at Japan GP

  • Qualifying postponed from Saturday to early Sunday
  • Race at Suzuka circuit to go ahead as planned

Organisers of Japan’s Formula One Grand Prix have cancelled all practice and qualifying sessions scheduled for Saturday due to the approach of Typhoon Hagibis.

Originally scheduled to take place at 3pm local time on Saturday, the hour-long qualifying session that decides the grid order for the race will now be held at 10am on Sunday, a revised schedule issued by organisers showed.

Related: Drivers back F1 to make right decision if Typhoon Hagibis hits Suzuka

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Drivers back F1 to make right decision if Typhoon Hagibis hits Suzuka

• Qualifying for Japanese Grand Prix could be moved to Sunday
• ‘If the typhoon is going to come here there’s no way we can drive’

Formula One drivers believe qualifying for the Japanese Grand Prix cannot take place on Saturday if the Suzuka circuit is hit by Typhoon Hagibis.

The FIA and F1 however will not make a decision on any postponement until Friday. Lewis Hamilton and others have backed their position after England’s Saturday meeting with France in the Rugby World Cup was cancelled well in advance of the expected arrival of the storm.

Related: Hagibis may wreak havoc in Suzuka but nothing can stop Mercedes | Giles Richards

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Hagibis may wreak havoc in Suzuka but nothing can stop Mercedes | Giles Richards

With a super typhoon threatening to mess with the Japanese Grand Prix it will only delay the coronation of the Silver Arrows and Lewis Hamilton

The spectre of super Typhoon Hagibis lurks over this weekend’s Japanese Grand Prix. Whether the storm hits Suzuka is subject to the vagaries of an “explosive” weather system. It may yet affect the timetable and even threaten the race itself but regardless of its impact, what Hagibis cannot do is prevent Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes’ inexorable march into the record books.

The scale of the super typhoon and its growth was illustrated colourfully by meteorologist Robert Speta in the Japan Times on Wednesday. He described its intensification as if: “You had a fire and instead of throwing gasoline on it to make it bigger you also grabbed some lighter fluid, a bit of oil and a couple of aerosol cans for good measure.”

Related: Beware the enemy within: Leclerc and Vettel continue a timeless F1 tradition | Richard Williams

Related: Ferrari create 'a war' while F1 continues to meddle with the rules | Giles Richards

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Beware the enemy within: Leclerc and Vettel continue a timeless F1 tradition | Richard Williams

A battle for supremacy between teammates is troubling Ferrari after the meltdown in Sochi and all eyes will be on Suzuka this weekend to see if it can be rectified

If there was ever a doubt that a racing driver’s first priority is to beat his teammate, it was dispelled one March afternoon at Melbourne’s Albert Park. The 1996 Australian Grand Prix was half done when Jacques Villeneuve came out of the pits just behind the race leader, Damon Hill.

“There he is,” said the voice on Villeneuve’s radio. “Go and get him!”

Related: The knocks keep coming at Ferrari but Charles Leclerc is learning fast | Giles Richards

Related: Ferrari create 'a war' while F1 continues to meddle with the rules | Giles Richards

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The knocks keep coming at Ferrari but Charles Leclerc is learning fast | Giles Richards

The Scuderia’s meltdown in Russia was latest tough lesson for Leclerc but he shows every sign of being formidable F1 force

Had Charles Leclerc not pursued a career in motor racing, it would be reasonable to assume that this thoughtful and intelligent 21-year-old might instead have recently completed a degree. Racing rather than academia always beckoned for Leclerc but right now, in the pressure-cooker environment of driving for Ferrari, this young driver is learning an awful lot of lessons. Every indication is that they are being taken to heart, forging a formidable character.

At last weekend’s Russian Grand Prix, Ferrari’s plan to govern their drivers through the opening corners fell apart publicly and with lasting ramifications. With Leclerc on pole and his teammate Sebastian Vettel in third, the team were focused on keeping Lewis Hamilton’s Mercedes, starting in second, away from the lead. To do so their arrangement was that Leclerc would give Vettel a slipstream into turn two, and if the German gained an advantage in doing so and took the lead, they would then swap positions.

Related: Lewis Hamilton wins Russia F1 GP as Vettel ignores orders before retiring

Related: Ferrari create 'a war' while F1 continues to meddle with the rules | Giles Richards

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Ferrari create 'a war' while F1 continues to meddle with the rules | Giles Richards

The Scuderia messed up their driver strategy in Sochi and the authorities’ reverse grid plans have angered Lewis Hamilton

Sebastian Vettel may have copped the attention and flak for refusing to obey team orders but at its heart this was a problem Ferrari created and failed to deal with well. Their attempt to micro-manage the start in the form of an agreement that Charles Leclerc would switch back to the lead if he gave Vettel a slipstream was unnecessarily complex. Nor did it allow for what happened when Vettel made a superb start and then showed great pace. Ferrari, however, were stuck with their plan and immediately tried to implement it. It was too rigid a reaction when they could have let it play out longer and swap them later in the race, as they ultimately did. With both championships gone, what is extraordinary is that they are still trying to run their men to a script rather than letting them race. Vettel will doubtless believe he was right to refuse to slow down and Leclerc that the German went back on an agreement – a recipe for disharmony but their team principal, Mattia Binotto, chose to look on the bright side. “I still believe it’s a luxury,” he said. “We have got two fantastic drivers, therefore that’s where I’m starting from.” Corriere dello Sport was perhaps closer to the truth with their headline: “Ferrari, this is war”

Related: Lewis Hamilton wins Russia F1 GP as Vettel ignores orders before retiring

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